Learn how to use Adobe apps, HTML, and CSS to become an in-demand web designer

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[“Source-bgr”]

 

Adobe’s board elects Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen as Chairman

Adobe today announced that its Board of Directors has elected Shantanu Narayen as Chairman of the Board. Narayen will continue in his role as President and CEO of Adobe and succeeds Co-Chairs and Co-Founders of the company, John Warnockand Chuck Geschke, who will remain on the Board.

“We are delighted that Shantanu Narayen, who has repeatedly demonstrated that he has the vision and capacity to lead Adobe into the future, will be the next chairman of Adobe,” said John Warnock and Chuck Geschke. “You cannot imagine how proud we are of our employees and the company that we have all built.”

Narayen’s vision and leadership drove Adobe’s transformation from a packaged software provider to one of the world’s largest and most diversified cloud companies. In 2009, Adobe acquired Omniture, launching what is now a multibillion-dollar digital marketing category and business for Adobe.

The company also announced that board member Jim Daley, a 35-year Price Waterhouse veteran and prior CFO of a publicly traded technology company, has been named Lead Director to ensure continued sound corporate governance. Daley has been a board member since 2001 and was formerly the head of the audit committee.

“Adobe’s co-founders John Warnock and Chuck Geschke have been instrumental in shaping Adobe’s innovation agenda and our unique culture for decades,” said Shantanu Narayen, Adobe president and CEO. “I’m grateful to John and Chuck for their ongoing counsel and for entrusting me with the leadership of the amazing company they founded.”

In 2011, Adobe moved its highly profitable creative software business to a software-as-a-service (SaaS) model, becoming the first packaged software company to successfully pivot to the cloud. Adobe is now transitioning its documents business—based on its PDF standard—to a cloud services model with its Document Cloud.

 

[Source:- Techrader]

 

Adobe updates Spark Video

featured_spark

Spark Video, Adobe’s video-storytelling app, just got a huge update. While users have always been able to use Spark Video to create animated videos that feature photos, narration, icons and text, users can now go one step further. They can now add video clips into their creations and projects, and the applications for this are almost endless.
This is part of Adobe’s initiative to respond to the rising demand of video on the web, with some stats predicting that video will represent as much as 80% of global Internet traffic by 2019.

According to a recent release on Adobe’s blog, video clips can be added to a designer’s video project in only a couple of minutes. With this new feature to flesh out video creation on this app, both designers and marketers can harness Video Spark’s platform to engage, connect with, and sell to their audiences more directly with the power of video.

Adobe’s blog post already shows off a slew of video clips that have been created by various companies and personalities with this new feature.

Including video clips was the most-requested feature by users from Video Spark, and the company has given its user base what it wanted.

Using the new feature is both intuitive and easy. Here’s what it involves:

To add a video clip, you simply need to add a slide to your Spark Video projects and then choose a video from your iPad, iPhone or computer. As opposed to working with video editors, the video clip can be grouped into a series of slides of different durations.

Users have the option of making a new point over the same video clip. All they have to do is just break it up into a new slide by selecting the “continue” button. After that, they can just overlay text, an icon, narration, and manipulate the volume.

Designed with the user experience in mind, people can also trim their video clips, so they can customize specifically the points at which the clip starts and ends. Thanks to one-touch trimming, users can do this with only their thumbs.

Of course, what’s a video clip and project without sound? The new feature makes it easy to add voices to the project. All it takes is tapping on the record button and speaking into the mic. Then, users will automatically align their video clips to the specific length of their narrations, all with one tap.

To put the finishing touches on a new video clip, music is essential. Users can add a music track to their clip to provide a general mood to their project. They can add their own tracks or select from the app’s suggestions. There’s also a mini-feature that lets users highlight key moments of sound within the clip to further grab the audience’s attention. Clip sounds can be set as ambient background, muted or emphasized.

Designers can try out Video Spark’s new feature right now, either directly from Adobe’s website or from the App Store.

 

[Source:- webdesignerdepot]

 

Adobe Typekit unveils major redesign

featured

Adobe Typekit has just released a long-overdue update to its font browsing interface. Currently still in beta, the new UI makes finding, and using fonts substantially easier. This is the biggest update to Typekit’s UI in 5 years and comparing the old with the new offers a fascinating insight into the way design priorities have shifted in the last few years.

The new design is more responsive, the dated fixed-width column having been replaced by flexible columns that look and feel great even on a phone—on screens like the iPad Pro, it’s a pleasure to use. The new design makes maximum use of the viewport by filling the available space, and the filters can now be neatly tucked away when not required.

The new Typekit UI is substantially simpler than its predecessor. Take for example theWeb/Desktop option introduced when Adobe began streaming fonts to Creative Cloud; the two toggle buttons have been replaced with an Include web-only families checkbox. (Anyone who produces mockups, style guides, or even graphics for clients will want to toggle that off immediately—so that Typekit only shows you fonts that can be synced as well as displayed on the web.)

Font syncing itself has also been sped up. To sync a font to Creative Cloud apps you no longer need to open a modal window, just click the Sync button next to the preview.

Happily, you can now enter numerals, punctuation, and diacritics as sample text. This is a godsend for designers working in languages other than English but also for anyone (such as myself) who enjoys browsing by ampersand.

You’ll also find easier access to premium fonts licensed through Typekit partners. If for example you’ve purchased a license for Frere-Jones’ new Mallory or Process Type’s beautiful Elena, you’ll find it listed under Purchased in the top left menu.

Perhaps the most welcome change has been the switch from infinite scrolling to pagination. In the old design, it was all too easy to click on a font for more details, then hit the browser’s back button and find yourself back at the start of your filtered results. Now, thanks to working with the browser’s default behaviour instead of against it, the back button takes you straight to the last page so you can continue browsing.

You can try out the new interface by logging into Typekit, clicking the Account link and toggling Early Access to On. The Typekit team are asking for feedback on the latest changes, so if there’s a feature you’ve always wanted, or if they’ve scrapped something you use everyday, now’s the time to speak up, via email or on Twitter.

Typekit is an excellent service, arguably one of Adobe’s best, but crowbarring new features like syncing, into a dated interface, lead to an increasingly frustrating user experience. Typekit’s new UI retains the best of the service, and maintains brand familiarity, while addressing most of its flaws.

What the new Typekit does best, is get out of the way. The new design is, if not actually invisible, certainly less opaque. That’s something we can all learn from.

 

 

 

[Source: webdesignerdepot]

Adobe Typekit unveils major redesign

filters_off

Adobe Typekit has just released a long-overdue update to its font browsing interface. Currently still in beta, the new UI makes finding, and using fonts substantially easier. This is the biggest update to Typekit’s UI in 5 years and comparing the old with the new offers a fascinating insight into the way design priorities have shifted in the last few years.

The new design is more responsive, the dated fixed-width column having been replaced by flexible columns that look and feel great even on a phone—on screens like the iPad Pro, it’s a pleasure to use. The new design makes maximum use of the viewport by filling the available space, and the filters can now be neatly tucked away when not required.

The new Typekit UI is substantially simpler than its predecessor. Take for example theWeb/Desktop option introduced when Adobe began streaming fonts to Creative Cloud; the two toggle buttons have been replaced with an Include web-only families checkbox. (Anyone who produces mockups, style guides, or even graphics for clients will want to toggle that off immediately—so that Typekit only shows you fonts that can be synced as well as displayed on the web.)

Font syncing itself has also been sped up. To sync a font to Creative Cloud apps you no longer need to open a modal window, just click the Sync button next to the preview.

Happily, you can now enter numerals, punctuation, and diacritics as sample text. This is a godsend for designers working in languages other than English but also for anyone (such as myself) who enjoys browsing by ampersand.

You’ll also find easier access to premium fonts licensed through Typekit partners. If for example you’ve purchased a license for Frere-Jones’ new Mallory or Process Type’s beautiful Elena, you’ll find it listed under Purchased in the top left menu.

Perhaps the most welcome change has been the switch from infinite scrolling to pagination. In the old design, it was all too easy to click on a font for more details, then hit the browser’s back button and find yourself back at the start of your filtered results. Now, thanks to working with the browser’s default behaviour instead of against it, the back button takes you straight to the last page so you can continue browsing.

You can try out the new interface by logging into Typekit, clicking the Account link and toggling Early Access to On. The Typekit team are asking for feedback on the latest changes, so if there’s a feature you’ve always wanted, or if they’ve scrapped something you use everyday, now’s the time to speak up, via email or on Twitter.

Typekit is an excellent service, arguably one of Adobe’s best, but crowbarring new features like syncing, into a dated interface, lead to an increasingly frustrating user experience. Typekit’s new UI retains the best of the service, and maintains brand familiarity, while addressing most of its flaws.

What the new Typekit does best, is get out of the way. The new design is, if not actually invisible, certainly less opaque. That’s something we can all learn from.

 

 

[Source: Webdesignerdepot]

Microsoft drives an Edge between Adobe and the web: Flash ads blocked

Microsoft will disable Flash ads by default in new versions of its Edge browser.

The Redmond software peddler said the upcoming Anniversary Update to Windows 10 will introduce a switched-on setting that disables some Flash content, requiring users to specifically activate Adobe’s plugin. If you have the Windows Insider preview build 14316, then you already have the feature.

“One of our top priorities in building Edge has been that the web should be a dependably safe, performant, and reliable place for our customers,” Microsoft said in announcing the feature.

“To that end, we’re introducing a change to give users more control over the power and resources consumed by Flash.”

With the new setting, Flash-based ads and animations in the browser window will not load by default. Things like video in the center of the page will be loaded as usual, but peripheral stuff will be frozen by default.

Microsoft noted that the change will help conserve memory and processor use by disabling the auto-run features some pages use for Flash ads. It will also help improve security by disabling malicious ads that exploit combinations of Flash and JavaScript vulnerabilities to inject malware into PCs.

That should, in turn, help to reduce the popularity of Flash as a target for “drive-by” exploits and malware downloads, at least amongst newer Windows systems that have switched over to Edge from Internet Explorer.

Microsoft, meanwhile, is urging developers and publishers to move away from Flash and towards HTML5 for rich web content. Google is also trying to hoof people off Flash ads.

“This transition to modern web standards has benefited users and developers alike,” Microsoft said. “Users experience improved battery life when sites use efficient web standards, lowering both memory and CPU demands.”

As always, make sure you have the most recent Edge security patches installed to keep ahead of exploits targeting Microsoft’s browser.

 

[Source:- Theregister]

Adobe issues emergency patch for Flash bug

Adobe Flash player

Adobe has issued an emergency patch for its Flash media player that closes loopholes in the widely used software.

In its security advisory, Adobe said one of the bugs was being actively exploited in a “limited number of targeted attacks”.

In total, the patch closes 23 separate security bugs in the Flash player.

Attackers abusing the security holes would be able to take over a computer to steal useful data or spy on the machine’s owner.

The update urges people to apply the patch as soon as possible because many of the problems are rated as critical – the highest level.

The holes are found in Flash as well as versions of other Adobe programs used on many different platforms and devices. At risk devices include Windows machines, Macs and Linux computers as well as phones running Android and iOS.

Adobe was alerted to the problems with its Flash player by many different security researchers including experts at Google, Microsoft, Kaspersky Labs and Alibaba.

Many security firms now recommend that people uninstall the Flash player to avoid falling victim to malicious attachments or booby-trapped webpages. A lot of web firms have now stopped using Flash in a bid to thwart attackers.

Several other companies issued big security patches this week. Firefox’s update closed 40 separate vulnerabilities, more than half of which were rated as critical.

In addition, Google issued an update for Chrome that, among other things, closed three security holes rated as “high” severity. It paid bug bounties totalling $13,000 (£9,000) to the two researchers who uncovered the loopholes.

On Tuesday, Microsoft issued its regular monthly security update that tackled 13 problems in several different programs including the Internet Explorer and Edge browsers.

 

[Source:- NNgroup]