Apple Fails to End Lawsuit Claiming It ‘Broke’ FaceTime

Apple Fails to End Lawsuit Claiming It 'Broke' FaceTime

Apple Inc has failed in its bid to dismiss a lawsuit claiming it disabled the popular FaceTime video conferencing feature on older iPhones to force users to upgrade.

US District Judge Lucy Koh ruled late on Friday that iPhone 4 and 4S users can pursue nationwide class action claims that Apple intentionally “broke” FaceTimeto save money from routing calls through servers owned by Akamai Technologies Inc.

Neither Apple nor lawyers for the plaintiffs immediately responded on Monday to requests for comment.

Apple began using Akamai’s servers after losing a lawsuit in 2012 in which VirnetX Holding Corp claimed that FaceTime technology infringed its patents.

Testimony from a 2016 retrial in that case showed that Apple paid Akamai $50 million (roughly Rs. 320 crores) in one six-month period.

The plaintiffs said Apple eventually created a cheaper alternative for its iOS 7 operating system, and in April 2014 disabled FaceTime on iOS 6 and earlier systems.

Koh said the plaintiffs alleged some measurable loss to their phones’ value, and could try to show that Cupertino, California-based Apple’s conduct constituted a trespass and violated state consumer protection laws.

The San Jose, California-based judge twice quoted from what the plaintiffs said was an Apple employee’s internal email characterising iOS 6 users as “basically screwed” because of the disabling of FaceTime.

She also rejected Apple’s argument that the plaintiffs suffered no economic loss because FaceTime was a “free” service.

“FaceTime is a ‘feature’ of the iPhone and thus a component of the iPhone’s cost,” Koh said in a footnote. “Indeed, Apple advertised FaceTime as ‘one more thing that makes an iPhone an iPhone.'”

The plaintiffs are led by Christina Grace of Marin County, California, and Ken Potter of San Diego County, California, who both owned the iPhone 4. Akamai was not named as a defendant.

The case is Grace et al v Apple Inc, US District Court, Northern District of California, No. 17-00551.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Update your phone’s operating system – it possibly has a malware vulnerability

It’s worth updating your phone’s operating system as soon as you can. Many top-of-the-line handsets have been found to have a vulnerability that potentially leaves them exposed to a malware attack.

The vulnerability (dubbed Broadpwn) affects the Wi-Fi chips on iPhones, Samsung Galaxy and Google Nexus devices. The name comes from the manufacturer of these chips, Broadcom.

The vulnerability was discovered by Nitay Artenstein, a researcher presenting at the Black Hat information security conference in Las Vegas.

It has now been patched, but you need to make sure that you are on iOS 10.3.3 if you’re an iPhone user, or have the July security update for Android to ensure the fix is on your device.

What is remarkable about this exploit is that that it is truly remote, meaning that it requires no action from the victim, the attacker doesn’t need to know anything about the device they are targeting, and the system can be taken over without crashing.

Spreading like wildfire, but it has limitations

An attacker can write programs directly onto the chipset, and as it’s the Wi-Fi chip the program can easily spread between devices, with the only criteria being that the devices are physically near each other.

Artenstein provided a proof of concept on stage at th

Artenstein provided a proof of concept on stage at the event by infecting a Samsung Galaxy device with his “worm” and then leaving it alone to infect another nearby Samsung phone with no further input from him, or any action required on the second handset.

The implications of this are fairly obvious, as an exploit of this kind could spread from handset to handset like a real virus.

The good news is that even without the patch, the exploit still has its limitations. It can only affect the Wi-Fi chip, and not the entire handset, meaning it could stop your Wi-Fi working but that’s about it. There would need to be a second vulnerability for it to infect more of the phone.

Artenstein’s proof of concept does add one extra insult to injury; any infected phone broadcasts the message “I’m pwned”, but only on wavelengths that those in the know will be able to hear.

  • Want to know more about the life of a hacker? Check out: Behind the code: a conversation with an ethical hacker

Source:-.techradar

Paytm Says It Plans to Sell Gold Worth $200 Million This Year

Paytm Says It Plans to Sell Gold Worth $200 Million This Year

Paytm plans to sell 5 tonnes of gold valued around $200 million (roughly Rs. 1,288 crores) this year, the digital payments firm said on Friday, as it strives to develop a viable business from its e-wallet platform.

E-wallets like Paytm, Citrus Pay and MobiKwik, which allow users to transfer money into virtual wallets via smartphone apps, have proliferated thanks to venture capital backing, but many are struggling to find a long-term profitable model.

Paytm, backed by Japan’s SoftBank Group and China’s Alibaba, is attempting to leverage its e-wallet to let customers buy and sell gold while getting a cut from each transaction.

“This is our way into wealth management,” Krishna Hedge, a senior executive at Paytm, told Reuters.

India is the world’s No. 2 consumer of gold behind China, with many saving their money in gold, using it to hedge against inflation and for gifts at special occasions. The country imports about 800 tonnes of gold a year.

The company launched its gold offering at the end of April and aims to sell 5 tonnes of gold in the fiscal year to March 2018. That amount of gold would be worth about Rs. 14 billion ($217 million) at current prices.

Clients will be able to buy and sell even miniscule amounts of gold digitally for as little as Re. 1 ($0.0155) via Paytm’s platform.

Paytm said it will not only allow users to trade in digital gold but it will also ship gold coins across much of India for those who want the metal delivered.

“This is actual physical gold that is stowed away in our vaults when you make a purchase,” said Hedge.

The 24-carat gold is sourced from a venture between Indian bullion importer MMTC and Swiss gold refiner PAMP.

Paytm, which leads the crowded e-wallet space in India, currently has more than 225 million users.

The industry enjoyed a huge boost from the federal government’s move to demonetise old high-value bank notes last year. The ensuing cash crunch sparked a surge in e-wallet transactions in a country where credit and debit-card usage is still limited.

Paytm now has plans to offer limited financial services through its niche bank.

“They are likely to add more such financial services in future and could even offer micro loans through tie-ups with banks,” said Neil Shah of technology research firm Counterpoint.

 

[“source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Amazon’s Meal Kits Go on Sale as It Looks to Expand Groceries Business

Amazon's Meal Kits Go on Sale as It Looks to Expand Groceries Business

Amazon has begun selling ready-to-cook meal packages for busy households in a bid to expand its groceries business.

Amazon-branded meal kits come with raw ingredients needed to prepare such meals as chicken tikka masala and falafel patties. They can help households save time; a kit for salmon with soba noodles can be prepared in just a half-hour, for instance. But at $16 to $20 (roughly Rs. 1,000 to Rs. 1,200) for two servings, they can be more expensive than buying ingredients separately in larger quantities.

The development comes as Amazon is also buying the organic grocer Whole Foods for $13.7 billion, a deal that would give the company a foothold in both groceries and brick-and-mortar retailing. Amazon could ultimately use Whole Foods’ more than 400 locations as distribution centers for all food services, including meal kits.

For now, Amazon’s meal kits are sold only in selected markets. The Associated Press was able to place an order in Seattle, Amazon’s headquarters. A similar search for meal kits in New York generated items only from third-party vendors such as Martha & Marley Spoon and Tyson Tastemakers. Amazon didn’t respond to requests for additional information.

Michael Pachter, an analyst at Wedbush Securities, said meal kits fall between regular groceries and deliveries of fully cooked meals and represent Amazon’s bid to expand its food business.

“I’m not sure any of this will work, but that’s where they are headed,” Pachter said in an email.

The food industry consulting firm Pentallect says meal kits represent a “rounding error” of $2.2 billion in a $1.5 trillion US food industry, but the firm forecasts growth of 25 percent to 30 percent a year over the next five years. Pentallect says that because relatively few households have yet to try meal kits, there’s a lot of room for growth.

Amazon meal kits are available only through the AmazonFresh grocery-delivery program, which costs $15 a month and requires a separate $99-a-year Prime membership. Delivery costs an additional $10 on orders of $40 or less, though free pickup options are available in Seattle.

Sales appeared to have begun in late June, based on customer reviews.

Earlier this month, Amazon applied for US trademark protection for the phrase “We do the prep. You be the chef.” for packaged food kits “ready for cooking and assembly as a meal.” Amazon listed a range of food types, including meat, seafood, salads and soups.

Shares of a leading competitor, Blue Apron, fell nearly 14 percent to $6.36 this week as reports of Amazon’s plans emerged at GeekWire and other news sites. That includes a 3.5 percent drop on Tuesday. Amazon’s stock increased $14.41, or 1.4 percent, to close Tuesday at $1024.45.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Social media genie won’t go back in the bottle, so we must teach youngsters to use it wisely

Image result for Social media genie won’t go back in the bottle, so we must teach youngsters to use it wiselyTeenagers in Britain are fortunate to have access to computers, laptops and smartphones from an early age. A child in the UK receives a smartphone at around the age of 12 – among the earliest in Europe. The natural consequence of this is that children spend a significant amount of their time on the internet. Nearly 20 years or so since the first social networks appeared on the internet, there has been considerable research into their psychological, societal, and health effects. While these have often been seen as largely negative over the years, there is plenty of evidence to the contrary.

A recent report from the Education Policy Institute, for example, studied children’s use of the internet and their mental health. The report found that teenagers value social networks as a way of connecting with friends and family, maintaining their networks of friends, and long distance connections. Teenagers see social networking as a comfortable medium for sharing their issues and finding solutions to problems such as social isolation and loneliness. They are also more likely to seek help in areas such as health advice, unknown experiences, and help with exams and study techniques.

Social networks afford the opportunity to find people with similar interests, or to support teamwork in school projects. In unsettled economic and political times, teenagers use social networks as a means to be heard and to get involved in political activism, as well as volunteering and charitable activities.

Teenagers also leverage social networks to engage with creative projects, and many young artists are first noticed through the exposure offered by the rich networking opportunities of social media, such as musicians on MySpace or photographers on image sharing sites Flickr or Behance. Teenagers looking to pursue careers in art or other creative industries turn to social platforms in order to create their portfolios as well as to create with others.

These opportunities have a positive impact on adolescent character formation and the development of their individual identity, and helps them toward choosing a career path. These choices are made at an early age and to this end social networks are enriching young people’s lives.

Risks not to be ignored

On the other hand the report was able to list a substantial list of negative influences stemming from social media use, ranging from time wasting and addictive, compulsive use, to cyber-bullying, radicalisation, stress and sexual grooming to name just a few.

Unsurprisingly governments are concerned with the impact of social networking on the vulnerable. Concern over the uncontrolled nature of social networking has prompted action from parents and politicians. The issue of children roaming freely on social networks became an issue in the recent UK general election, and was mentioned in the Conservative party manifesto, which made a key pledge of “safety for children online, and new rights to require social media companies to delete information about young people as they turn 18”. This is a tall order, as it would require erasing tens of millions of teenagers’ profiles on around 20 different social platforms, hosted in different countries worldwide.

The Conservatives also suggested the party would “create a power in law for government to introduce an industry-wide levy from social media companies and communication service providers to support awareness and preventative activity to counter internet harms”. Awareness-raising is an important step towards encouraging conscious social media use among the young. But despite continuing efforts to educate youngsters about the dangers (and, to be fair, the benefits) of using social media, many are wary of the impact technology may have on overly-social teenagers once outside parental control.

It has been shown that teenagers increasingly use social networks in private, leaving parents outside environments where children are exposed to real-time content and largely unguarded instant communications. The concern raised in the report that “responses to protect, and build resilience in, young people are inadequate and often outdated” is timely. While schools are tasked with educating teenagers about the risks of social media, very few parents are able to effectively introduce controls on the content their children access and monitor the evolving threats that operate online.

Speak their language

A recent study of compulsive social media use showed that it is not the user’s age that matters, but their individual motivations. In fact users who are highly sociable and driven by friends towards compulsive social media use suffer physically and socially. On the other hand when users are driven by hedonic (fun-seeking) motivations, their physical health and sociability improves. This explains why teenagers in the UK see social networking as a positive phenomenon that enriches their social life. There is clearly potential to harness these positives.

While the tech giants that run the social networks with billions of users must play their part to ensure the safety of their youngest users, it is also parents’ role to talk openly with their children about their use of social networks and demand expected standards of use. Teenagers have questions about life and are looking for answers to their problems as they go through a challenging time of life. With the prime minister naming “mental health as a key priority” schools, parents, politicians and social networking platforms should help teenagers to build resilience to what they encounter online and how it makes them feel, rather than adopting only a safeguarding approach. It’s interesting to note that 78% of young people who contact the organisation Childline now do so online: teachers, family and friends providing support should make the most of a medium which today’s children and teenagers are comfortable with.

[“Source-theconversation.”]

Chasing social media shares harms public trust in science – so stop it

There is no substantive evidence that Instagram use is connected with depression. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

Last month US TV channel CNBC published an online news story based on a study which it said showed that Instagram is “most likely to cause young people to feel depressed and lonely” out of the major social apps. But the “study” is actually a survey which fails to provide substantive evidence that Instagram is the worst for mental health, or that there is even a relationship between social media use and depression or loneliness. It was another enticing – but misleading – headline.

Over the next days the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH), which published the report in conjunction with the Young Health Movement charity, retweeted and shared news stories like CNBC’s. The society’s report was featured by most national media outlets, and although some pointed out that it was based on a survey, others presented it in a way that could be construed as scientific research. In any case, most included a statement about Instagram being damaging to mental health in the title in a way that made the findings appear more conclusive than the report suggests.

But there are problems with treating a survey as a scientific study given the differences in methodology, even if it is based on nearly 1,500 responses. Researchers have pointed out the important differences in measures and analyses. They also noted that the report also contains unfounded statements – for instance, the research article given as a reference for the claim that social media is more addictive than smoking only examined “media use”, not social media use.

The report’s findings are based on young people’s answers to 14 self-designed questions about how different social media platforms affect their lives. The answers are then summed to create a “mental health ranking” of the various platforms. You cannot truly measure the mental health impact of a social media platform by adding together people’s answers to single questions about how specific sites give them “FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out – feeling you need to stay connected because you are worried things could be happening without you)” or affect their “self-identity” or “sleep”.

Instead, to show mental health impact you need long-term studies that measure mental health with tried-and-tested measures or which examine real-life health outcomes like incidences of diagnosed depression. Combining responses to 14 freely-designed questions to measure health outcomes doesn’t yield meaningful results. It goes against the most basic scientific practice taught to undergraduate psychologists and trainee medics.

While the report is intended to be a call for action to stimulate further, more rigorous research, the way in which it was covered by the media could be misleading for the general public. The problem is that it’s the exciting, shareable headlines which seem to get all the media coverage, even when they are not based on peer-reviewed work.

While I do agree with many of the suggestions put forward in the RSPH report, I think it’s important that the public understand the difference between a survey and research based on scientific methods of inquiry. Psychological researchers are working hard to make their science more robust through transparency initiatives like the pre-registration of scientific research. But if the public keep reading contradictory headlines based on weak research in the media, it won’t be easy to maintain trust in our discipline.

Join the higher education network for more comment, analysis and job opportunities, direct to your inbox. Follow us on Twitter @gdnhighered. And if you have an idea for a story, please read our guidelines and email your pitch to us at [email protected]

Looking for a higher education job? Or perhaps you need to recruit university staff? Take a look at Guardian Jobs, the higher education specialist

[“Source-theguardian”]

Software on Mars rover allows it to pick research targets autonomously

Software on Mars rover allows it to pick research targets autonomously

Taking only 21,000 of the Curiosity mission’s total 3.8 million lines of code, AEGIS accurately selected desired targets over 2.5 kilometers of unexplored Martian terrain 93% of the time, compared to the 24% expected without the software. …more

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers form the U.S., Denmark and France has created a report regarding the creation and use of software meant to give exploratory robots in space more autonomy. In their paper published in the journal Science Robotics, the team describes the software, called Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science (AEGIS), and how well it performed on the Mars rover Curiosity.

Because of their limited computing power and distance from the Earth, space scientists believe that it would be advantageous for exploratory robots to have the ability to select which things to study. It would also allow for more research to be done when a robot is not able to communicate with Earth, such as when it is on the opposite face of a planet. Without such a system, a robot would have to scan a region, photograph it, send the photographic images back to Earth and then wait for instructions on what to do. With such a system, a robot such as Curiosity could scan the horizon, pick an object to study and then drive over and study it. This approach would save a lot of time, allowing the robot to study more objects before its useful lifespan expires. Because of that, NASA commissioned a team to create such software, which eventually became AEGIS. The software was tested and then uploaded to Curiosity in May of 2016 and was used 54 times over the next 11 months.

The software allows the rover to control what has been dubbed the ChemCam, which is a device that is used to study rocks or other geologic features—a laser is fired at a target and then sensors measure the gases that occur as a result.

The researchers report that they found the system to be 93 percent accurate compared to 24 percent without its use. The software, they claim, saved many hours of mission time, which was used for engaging in other useful activities such as studying meteorite content. They also report that the software allowed for an increase in ChemCam targeting from 256 per day to 327, which meant that more data was collected in the same amount of time.

Software on Mars rover allows it to pick research targets autonomously
(A) The ChemCam gaze. (B) ChemCam shoots lasers at rocks to analyze their content, leaving visible marks both on the surface (upper right) and inside the 16-mm-diameter drill hole (center) of this “Windjana” drill site. (C) ChemCam-measured …more
Software on Mars rover allows it to pick research targets autonomously
Examples of AEGIS target selection, collected from Martian day 1400 to 1660. Targets outlined in blue were rejected; those outlined in red were retained. Top-ranked targets are shaded green, and second-ranked targets are shaded orange. …more
Software on Mars rover allows it to pick research targets autonomously
Examples of AEGIS fixing human commands that miss the mark, called “autonomous pointing refinement.” (A, C) Human-calculated targets in red. (B, D) Target refinement by AEGIS indicated in red. Credit: Francis et al., Sci. Robot. 2, eaan4582 (2017)

Explore further: Curiosity Mars rover can choose laser targets on its own

More information: AEGIS autonomous targeting for ChemCam on Mars Science Laboratory: Deployment and results of initial science team use, Science Robotics (2017). robotics.sciencemag.org/lookup/doi/10.1126/scirobotics.aan4582

Abstract
Limitations on interplanetary communications create operations latencies and slow progress in planetary surface missions, with particular challenges to narrow–field-of-view science instruments requiring precise targeting. The AEGIS (Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science) autonomous targeting system has been in routine use on NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover since May 2016, selecting targets for the ChemCam remote geochemical spectrometer instrument. AEGIS operates in two modes; in autonomous target selection, it identifies geological targets in images from the rover’s navigation cameras, choosing for itself targets that match the parameters specified by mission scientists the most, and immediately measures them with ChemCam, without Earth in the loop. In autonomous pointing refinement, the system corrects small pointing errors on the order of a few milliradians in observations targeted by operators on Earth, allowing very small features to be observed reliably on the first attempt. AEGIS consistently recognizes and selects the geological materials requested of it, parsing and interpreting geological scenes in tens to hundreds of seconds with very limited computing resources. Performance in autonomously selecting the most desired target material over the last 2.5 kilometers of driving into previously unexplored terrain exceeds 93% (where ~24% is expected without intelligent targeting), and all observations resulted in a successful geochemical observation. The system has substantially reduced lost time on the mission and markedly increased the pace of data collection with ChemCam. AEGIS autonomy has rapidly been adopted as an exploration tool by the mission scientists and has influenced their strategy for exploring the rover’s environment.

[“Source-ndtv”]

 

Google Glass, Apple Newton, Nokia N-Gage Make It to ‘Museum of Failure’

Image result for Google Glass, Apple Newton, Nokia N-Gage Make It to 'Museum of Failure'

HIGHLIGHTS
Google Glass has made its entry to the Museum of Failure
Joining it are the Apple Newton and Nokia N-gage
The Museum of Failure is open to the public in downtown Helsingborg
Google and Apple are not synonymous with failure but in the risky business of innovation, anything is possible. At Sweden’s newly opened Museum of Failure, Google Glass and Apple Newton are two such devices that were either ahead of their time or the results of some bad ideas.

Founded by clinical psychologist Samuel West, the museum that opened on June 7 to the public has over 70 failed products and services from around the world.

“We know that 80 to 90 percent of innovation projects, they fail and you never read about them, you don’t see them, people don’t talk about them. And if there’s anything we can do from these failures, it’s learn from them,” West told CBS News.

The list has Nokia “N-gage” device, Orbitoclast Lobotomy (medical instrument), Harley-Davidson Perfume, Kodak Digital Camera, Sony Betamax and Lego Fiber Optics, among others, the information available on the Museum of Failure website stated.

Developed and marketed by Apple Inc starting 1987, Newton was one of the first personal digital assistants to feature handwriting recognition. Apple shipped the first devices in 1993.

Initially considered as innovative, Apple founder Steve Jobs directed the company to stop the production of Apple Newton devices in 1998.

 

According to reports, Newton devices ran on a proprietary operating system called Newton OS. The high price and early problems with its handwriting recognition feature limited its sales.

Google Glass, an eye-wearable device, created a storm when the company handed over a prototype to a few “Glass Explorers” in 2013 for $1,500 (roughly Rs. 1,00,000).

The optical head-mounted display became available to public in May 2014 but was discontinued in 2015 owing to privacy and safety concerns. The device, however, is now gaining momentum in the medical industry.

Nokia made “N-Gage” mobile device and handheld game system that ran on Series 60 platform on Symbian OS. The device, released in October 2003, was discontinued two years later. “N-Gage” suffered from a poor gaming library.

The Museum of Failure is open to the public in downtown Helsingborg.

[“Source-ndtv”]

Do You Know What it Feels Like to Get Hacked?

Do You Know What It Feels Like To Get Hacked? | Social Media Today

Hopefully your answers is “no”, and the intention of this blog is to keep you cyber safe in 2017.

Remember the hack of the Ashley Madison site? The top 3 passwords used on that site were “123456”, “12345” and “password”.

While there are no guarantees that malicious actors won’t get to your information, the following tips will decrease the probability of having your personal information hacked.

Let’s do some cyber maintenance. In addition to changing your passwords, learn other ways to make your cyber presence safer.

1. Have Complicated, Unique, Difficult-To-Crack Passwords

Hate changing your passwords for your social media, online banking, Amazon.com and other online accounts? So do I. But having someone invade your privacy, social channels, or even financial information is a lot worse.

A good solution to create strong passwords (and track them at the same time) is to sign up for a password storage tool. 1Password carries a yearly fee, and I’ve also heard good things about a free tool called LastPass.

All you need to do, once you have such a tool, is to create one really complex password and remember it. Then you can let the tool auto-generate all your other long and tricky passwords, which you won’t need to remember.

2. Never Reuse a Password

Don’t use the same password or slightly modify it to use it on multiple accounts.

Make each password unique, with a mix of upper and lower case letters, numbers, special characters – at least 9 characters, ideally more.

3. Update Your Passwords Regularly

Change your passwords periodically (at least every 6-12 months). While having a really difficult password is the number one way to protect your accounts, changing your password can’t hurt.

4. Prevent “Dictionary Attacks”

Don’t use dictionary words, your pet’s name, your college or any other words that have an obvious correlation to you as a person. These are easy to find, even just via Google, and so-called “dictionary attacks” – which are extremely common and simple – can crack those passwords in no time.

NOTE: Personally, I also discourage publishing your birthday on LinkedIn or Facebook as this date is a crucial detail to cracking and taking over your (online) identity; especially in the USA where birth date and social security number ARE your identity.

5. Keep Your Security and Privacy Settings Current

Facebook, LinkedIn and other social media channels occasionally change their privacy options, which is easy to miss (or dismiss) as such updates are not particularly interesting.

For a safe 2017, visit your social channels and review your privacy and notification settings. While you’re there, disconnect access for apps you no longer use.

6. Enable Two-Factor-Authentication

Something often dismissed as too complicated is two-step-verification.

Most social platforms, banks and other accounts now provide this as an option – here’s how it works:

  • In addition to your password, every time you sign in, you get a text message or app notification with a code that you need to enter before you get access to your account.
  • You’ll be asked to specify your trusted device(s) to receive the code, e.g. your iPhone or iPad, so only you have access.

7. Don’t Store Passwords in Your Browser

I know, it seems convenient but hackers feel the same way.

Browser attacks are very common – here’s some more information on common threats by Kaspersky.

8. Have a Security Program Installed

You need a virus protection program at a minimum, and many of these now come with privacy packages to help you in case you do get hacked.

Here’s a suggestion for 10 virus protection programs. Also consider a service that alerts you to invasions into your personal information, like changes in your credit report. One option is Lifelock.

9. Install Software Updates

Don’t dally when it comes to installing updates to your applications, operating system or website. While I admit that I sometimes wait a few days when a new OS update comes out so that the main bugs can be fixed first, I never wait for more than a week.

10. Be Suspicious of URLs Before You Click

Phishing is generally an attempt to get users to click on a malicious URL that will upload a virus if you do.

Never click on a URL sent by your bank, PayPal or other account that requires you to sign in.

Often, malicious actors will steal your password that way, or upload a virus. Instead, go to the site directly and log-in from there to check on any message.

Also, be suspicious about the senders of any message you receive via email or social media. Sometimes when I see a shortened link, I ask the sender to give me the URL to look it up myself or I pass.

 

 

[Source:- Socialmediatoday]

The Power of Geofencing and How to Add it to Your Marketing [Infographic]

The Power of Geofencing and How to Add It to Your Marketing | Social Media Today

Thanks to the ubiquitous smartphone, there’s now an entirely new level of marketing available: Geofencing.

Geofencing is a location-based marketing tool that enables more active consumer focus. There are three ways to track a customer’s location: GPS, Bluetooth, and beacons, and each method finds and targets customers in different ways. And while it’s a relatively new technology, it’s important for marketers to be aware of- and understand – geofencing in order to help their company’s bottom line.

A solid 30% of the international population uses location-based services, and an overwhelming majority of them are open to receiving location-based alerts from businesses. This can help increase sales and loyalty, especially when paired with CRM data, because you can offer individual customers the messaging they need in order to make a conversion.

With 92% of U.S. smartphones capable of responding to geofencing, this is a powerful marketing tool that retailers and other location-based companies need to use.

[Source:- socialmediatoday]