Essential Raises $300 Million From Amazon, Others; Will Announce Smartphone Release Date Next Week

Essential Raises $300 Million From Amazon, Others; Will Announce Smartphone Release Date Next Week

Essential Products, the smartphone startup founded by a co-creator of the Android mobile operating system, has raised $300 million (roughly Rs. 1,921 crores) in new funding and signed up retailers to sell its first device, it said on Wednesday.

The $699 phone, with a titanium and ceramic case, will compete directly against new devices from Samsung and Apple this holiday season. Retailers include Best Buy, Amazon.com and carriers Sprint in the United States and Telus in Canada, Essential said in a statement.

The company, founded by Chief Executive Andy Rubin in late 2015, said Access Technology Ventures led the funding round, which brought its total investment raised to $330 million.

Strategic investors also included Tencent Holdings, electronics contract manufacturer Foxconn and Amazon.com, which participated via its Alexa Fund. Previous investors Redpoint Ventures and Playground Global also participated.

A release date for Essential’s phone will be announced next week, President Niccolo De Masi said in an interview.

The timing and distribution of the new phone could be critical during a year with many new releases. The Essential phone will only be displayed in Sprint and Best Buy retail stores in the United States, compared with the vast distribution network of the market leaders. In September, Samsung is expected to unveil its Galaxy Note 8, and Apple is expected to announce its highly anticipated 10th anniversary iPhone.

Some of the Essential phone’s features, like a detachable 360-degree camera, are also available on Samsung models, which are bulkier.

“It’s going to be extraordinarily challenging,” Bob O’Donnell of Technalysis Research said by phone. “The initial specs of the phone look good, but not necessarily unique.”

Amazon, Best Buy and Essential will sell unlocked versions of the phone that can be used on any network. But carrier discounts could encourage buyers, R. “Ray” Wang of Constellation Research said in an interview. He said he expected Sprint to charge $300 with a two-year contract.

Sprint did not return a request for comment.

Wang also said the presence of two strategic investors from Asia signals Essential’s broader goals.

“It’s not just about US distribution. This is going to be a global phone,” Wang said. “The biggest phone markets are China, India and the US”

Essential will focus on “building a brand in the Western World” before expanding to other countries, De Masi said. It would consider sales of “low single-digit millions” of phones in its first year a success, he added, noting that production was limited by the unusual materials of titanium and ceramic. Most phones have aluminium or plastic casings.

“Over the next five to 10 years, we will have the same retail footprint and product diversity as Samsung and Apple,” he said.

source:-gadget360

Local engineers secure internet-connected toys from hackers

ARAPAHOE COUNTY – For all the fun and games that come with a toy, Tyler Bell’s job is a little fun, but no game, he says, when it comes to security.

“There’s a lot of things that get hacked nowadays,” Bell says.

He is the Director of Application Security for ViaWest Professional Services. Bell worked with the Sphero toy company to make the latest internet-connected Spider-Man toy more secure.

“All the moving pieces, what’s talking to what, how is it doing so?” Bell says.

Bell says hackers can use internet-connected toys to steal private data off your phone or computer.

“Take and store sensitive information such as your name, address, social security numbers, emails,” Bell says.

Bell and his ViaWest team had to have the “mindset of a hacker” to find holes and vulnerabilities in the toy’s functions, especially while connected to the internet.

“I think we do an awesome job at securing these types of devices, but nothing is impenetrable, nothing’s unhackable,” Bell says.

The real answer, he says, is for parents to see past the fun and games and be serious about the toys their kids bring into the house. Bell suggests getting a privacy statement from manufacturers about their toys.

“Folks shouldn’t be scared off from using these types of toys and devices,” Bell says. “They should just be aware of what they do.”

[“Source-9news”]

This web design bundle will teach you everything from HTML to Flash

Every aspiring web designer needs to have a toolkit of skills totally mastered. With The Web Design CPD Certification Bundle, you can become an expert on the four essentials.

You’ll master web programming languages HTML and CSS, create and edit images with Photoshop and use Dreamweaver to develop responsive HTML websites. The bundle even teaches you to make clever animations with Flash.

Gain the skills you need to become an employable web designer at any company. Plus, you’ll earn CPD credits for each course as you go along.

Launch your design career today! Get The Web Design CPD Certification Bundle for $39 from the Daily Dot Store.

Buy it here

MORE BAZAAR DEALS:

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The Daily Dot may receive a payment in connection with purchases of products or services featured in this article. Click here to learn more.

[“Source-dailydot”]

Here’s China’s latest plan to keep its citizens from the open Internet

The Chinese government is cracking down on a key technology that Web surfers use to protect their privacy and get around online censorship, according to Bloomberg News.

Some of the country’s biggest telecom companies — Bloomberg lists state-run China Mobile, China Unicom and China Telecom — are being instructed to block customers from using virtual private networks, a technology that redirects a person’s Internet traffic through other servers to make it look like they are connected to the Web from someplace else.

For years, Chinese citizens have used VPNs to circumvent the country’s Great Firewall, the colloquial term for blocks and restrictions imposed on the Internet by Beijing in an effort to ensure that only a filtered version of the Web is visible to most of the country. VPNs have allowed tech-savvy Chinese Internet users to access restricted news sites and social media platforms, such as Twitter and Facebook.

China has periodically clamped down on Internet users’ attempts to evade the Great Firewall. The last such campaign took place in 2016, prompting widespread reports of VPN outages. But the government has intensified its attack on VPNs in recent months. In January, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology ruled that all VPNs that did not seek government approval to operate would be deemed illegal. Since then, a slew of VPN providers have been forced to shut down, citing regulatory warnings. Under President Xi Jinping, the VPN crackdown is part of an effort to “clean up” the Chinese Internet and enhance the country’s “cyber sovereignty,” the government has said.

The moves will make it harder for the average Chinese citizen, who may not be tech savvy, to find a way to access the open Internet, said Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert and China scholar at the New York-based Council on Foreign Relations.

“Bad,” he said of the implications of the ban. “Getting around [it] will require using VPNs based outside of the mainland or setting up and using [one’s] own VPN servers, additional barriers for the individual user.”

Other analysts say China’s latest move raises the risk of even further action by the government down the road.

“It is clear that the crackdown has intensified,” said Charlie Smith, the pseudonymous co-founder of GreatFire.org, a website that monitors China’s Internet filtering and maintains an app to help Internet users get past the restrictions. “The authorities could take other steps to block our app, which would be extreme, more extreme than this. I didn’t think they would consider doing that before but I would say it is a possibility now.”

Commercial VPNs operate commonly worldwide. Many saw a flurry of interestfrom U.S. customers in the spring, as a Republican-led rollback of federal privacy protections prompted American Internet users to seek ways to shield their Web browsing activity from their own broadband providers. U.S. Internet providers said that adjusting the privacy protections could help them mine, store and share their customers’ Internet usage history to sell advertising and compete with major online advertisers, such as Google and Facebook.

[“Source-washingtonpost”]

InFocus Turbo 5 with 5000mAh battery launched; price starts from Rs. 6,999

InFocus Turbo 5 with 5000mAh battery launched

The InFocus Turbo 5 is exclusively available via the online retailer Amazon India. The 2GB RAM variant is priced at Rs. 6,999 and the 3GB RAM variant is priced at Rs. 7,999. The device will be going on sale starting from July 4, 2017. Let’s take a look at the other details of the InFocus Turbo 5 from here.
Powerful design

Powerful design

The InFocus Turbo 5 features a powerful design. It has a unibody metal build despite being slim and light. Also, there is a fingerprint sensor at the rear that can unlock the phone in 0.5 seconds. It serves other functions such as starting the flashlight and clicking selfies. The device has a 5.2-inch IPS display with HD 720p resolution. It is a 2.5D curved glass panel.

Hardware aspects

Hardware aspects

The InFocus smartphone makes use of a quad-core MediaTek MT6734 processor. The device is available in two variants – one with 2GB RAM and 16GB storage and the other with 3GB RAM and 32GB storage. Both the variants support expandable storage up to 32GB.
Camera seems good

Camera seems good

The InFocus smartphone flaunts a 13MP main camera at its rear with f/2.2 aperture. There is HDR mode, panorama mode, filters, image stabilization and Beauty mode. Up front, the device has a 5MP selfie camera with a similar aperture and beauty mode

Battery is its highlight

Battery is its highlight

The InFocus Turbo 5 is fitted with a 5000mAh battery that is claimed to render up to 34 days of standby time, up to 50 hours of usage, up to 15 hours of online video viewing or up to 23 hours of video calling.

[“source-gadgets.ndtv”]

 

Best gap year tech: from Torino to Tokyo, these gadgets will help you have a great time

If you’re planning a gap year or packing for the trip of a lifetime, you’ll want to cram as many creature comforts into your backpack as possible, not to mention some tech on which to record and share some phenomenal views and bragging rights. We’re rounded up some near-essentials (aside from a huge backpack and warm coat) to make travelling easier and more exciting, whether you’re trekking through jungles and camping in the wild or catching trains and seeing the sights of Europe. Just don’t forget your toothbrush.

Sure, you’ll need a massive rucksack for lugging your worldly possessions from hostel to hostel, but it won’t be much use for sightseeing in a busy metropolis. Thankfully, there’s the Wolffepack that comes in many forms, including the ‘Capture’ for photographers that keeps all your tech, money and passport safe and sound.

Designed to allow users to reach into their bag without the hassle of unstrapping and taking it off, the backpacks all come with a  clever ‘orbital trapeze’ system that allows a wearer to swing the pack from their back to their front effortlessly. While this is a time saver, it’s also great if you want to keep your bag where you can see it on a sketchy street or busy train.

The Capture holds 26 litres and comes with a removable camera pod, three compartments, tripod clip, laptop sleeves and waterproof rain cover. With Carbon fibre, Kevlar and Dyneema cords, it’s also built to withstand the wildest of adventures.

GoPro HERO5 Action Camera

While serious photographers seldom travel without an SLR, the GoPro is brilliant for people on the go and perfect for recording bike rides and scenes you’ll want to remember in years to come. The HERO5 Black is dubbed the ‘best GoPro ever’ and supports video resolutions up to 4K at 30 frames per second, video stabilisation and stereo audio recording, as well as professional quality 12MP photos.

A simple one button control and two-inch touch display makes operating it a breeze and it’s waterproof without a housing up to 33 feet – great for recording a white water rapids ride or trip to a waterfall. Once users have recorded their envy-enduring footage, the HERO5 can auto-upload their photos and videos to the cloud for safe keeping and share it easily online. It makes bragging easy.

Cat S30 smartphone

You may be surgically attached to your iPhone or top-of-the-range Android in the city, but we all know dropping these handsets can prove to be an expensive mistake. Instead, why not invest in the Cat S30 handset. Built to be work in extreme environments, the water, dust and shockproof smartphone is designed to survive a 1.8-metre drop test and has an easy grip design as well as 12 hours talk time and up to 19 days standby – perfect if you’re staying in the back-of-beyond (or have mislaid your charger).

Price: £239.99 | Buy Cat S30 smartphone

Griffin Survivor Extreme

A tablet is a godsend when you’re pushed for space, working as a map, address book, novel, games console and internet café if you’re lucky. But they can be delicate, making a ruggedized case a sensible investment. Griffin Technology makes an array of ‘Survivor’ cases for different models, including the iPad Air 2 (pictured) to protect their backs and screens.

The new ‘Survivor Extreme’ is built to enable the iPad4 mini to survive drops onto concrete of up to 6.6-feet, cushioning falls within the impact-resistant shell. Its slide on design all but eliminates the air gap between touchscreen and the screen guard for extra protection, while its sealed shell protects the device from mud and water.

Price: £69 | Buy Griffin Survivor Extreme

ThermaCELL ProFLEx Heavy Duty Heated Insoles

Whether you’re trekking at high altitudes or staying in a drafty hostel, your toes can get chilly, especially once the sun has set. ThermaCELL ProFLEx Heavy Duty Heated Insoles heat up a user’s feet and can be controlled using a smartphone with a Bluetooth connection. The accompanying app lets users warm their feet to a chosen temperature. When this is reached, the insoles temporarily turn off before switching on again.

They’re cushioned to make walking boots more comfortable and include removable, replaceable extended life batteries so users can swap them out without having to wrangle their insoles out of their shoes or boots. One charge taking just two hours provides up to 8.5 hours of warmth. There are Bluetooth Pocket Warmers too for people who want heat on demand in a more flexible package.

 

 

[Source:- T3]

The Trump bump – when a diss from Donald is good for business

Moving on up ... thanks to Trump’s tweets.

When Donald Trump tweets, PR departments tremble in their designer footwear. “Pretty much everybody is dreading being the subject of a tweet,” said Kristin Dziczek of the Michigan-based Center for Automotive Research. “Getting hauled out into the court of public opinion with virtually no warning is not something anybody wants to get engaged with.”

No wonder: if, like General Motors, Ford or Toyota, you’re a car-maker manufacturing outside the US, having the president-elect attack your business model and threaten you with a massive tax bill (eg: “General Motors is sending Mexican-made model of Chevy Cruze to US car-dealers tax free across border.Make in USA or pay big border tax!”) is calamitous.

But not everybody need fear the tweeter. Meryl Streep couldn’t buy better publicity than have Trump tweet that she is “one of the most over-rated actresses in Hollywood, doesn’t know me but attacked last night at the Golden Globes”. Truly, there is literally nothing that makes me want to programme a double bill of Sophie’s Choice and Out of Africa more than reading that. As someone – whose spell checker doesn’t work – counter-tweeted: “havnt you got a job to do like running a country isntead of bitching like some z list celebrity, im embaressed for you”, with good reason.

In his eight years on Twitter, Trump has sent 34,300 tweets to followers now counted at 19.2 million, attacking 61 companies or brands. Among them the BBC (“a scandal ridden wasteland – a one-sided piece of garbage!”), the makers of Glenfiddich (“We are getting rid of all Glenfiddich garbage alcohol from Trump properties”), Coca-Cola (“The Coca-Cola company is not happy with me – that’s OK, I’ll still keep drinking that garbage”) and – love this – Twitter: “Wow, Twitter, Google and Facebook are burying the FBI criminal investigation of Clinton. Very dishonest media!”

Why does Donald diss? Trump has “like many bullies, a skin of gossamer”, observed Graydon Carter, the editor of Vanity Fair and longtime Trump enemy. On the plus side, let’s not forget, he is quite the wordsmith. “I hope everybody possible cancels their subscription to the failing, boring abd [sic] totally biased New York “Ragazine” – SAVE YOUR MONEY!” Did you see what he did there? “Ragazine”? Genius. And caps lock? Nice touch.

Whether Trump grows a thicker skin and stops using what Carter once described as his “abnormally stubby” fingers to terror-tweet from the Oval Office remains to be seen. But many must be hoping not. After all, for some, a late-night, rancorous terror-tweet from the most powerful man on Earth is just the thing to keep shareholders sweet. Here are some people and brands who got a bump thanks to Trump.

John Lewis

Last week, the Democrat congressman and civil rights veteran told NBC that he did not regard the recent election as legitimate and was not planning to attend Trump’s inauguration this Friday. “I think the Russians participated in helping this man get elected. And they helped destroy the candidacy of Hillary Clinton,” he said. Furious, Trump tweeted: “Congressman John Lewis should spend more time on fixing and helping his district, which is in horrible shape and falling apart. All talk, talk, talk – no action or results. Sad!”

Lewis responded at a memorial breakfast on Martin Luther King Day this week with a speech in which he didn’t deign to name Trump, but clearly alluded to him: “So I say to the future leaders of this state, the future leaders of this nation, of the world – you must never, ever hate. The way of love is a better way. The way of peace is a better way,” he said.

One result of the row is that March, Lewis’s graphic novel about the US civil rights movement, shot from 451st place in the overall bestseller lists to No 1, while his memoir Walking the Wind: A Memoir of the Movement rose 8,699 places to No 2. Further down the charts, his 2012 book Across That Bridge: Life Lessons and a Vision for Change, which recounts lessons learned as an activist, leapt from 34,480 to 175 in the overall bestseller list on Amazon.com and took top spot on the online bookseller’s philosophy of ethics and morality chart.

Think of it this way: some industry experts have been sceptical about whether a Trump presidency will be good for American business. But, in fact, even before he takes office, Trump is having a positive impact. Albeit unwittingly.

Vanity Fair

Restaurant critic Tina Nguyen once accepted a dare to eat an eyeball that a butcher had popped out of the skull of a roasted pig. “That eyeball,” she wrote, “tasted better than the Trump Grill’s Gold Label Burger, a … short-rib burger blend moulded into a sad little meat thing, sitting in the centre of a massive, rapidly staling brioche bun, hiding its shame under a slice of melted orange cheese. It came with overcooked woody batons called ‘fries’ – how can someone mess up fries? – and ketchup masquerading as Heinz. If the cheeseburger is a quintessential part of America’s identity, Trump’s pledge to ‘make America great again’ suddenly appeared not very promising.”

Nguyen’s review appeared in Vanity Fair under the headline “Trump Grill could be the worst restaurant in America” (just imagine the competition for that title) before Christmas, prompting Trump to tweet: “Has anyone looked at the really poor numbers of @VanityFair magazine. Way down, big trouble, dead! Graydon Carter, no talent, will be out!”

Unfortunately for Trump’s thesis, someone looked at Vanity Fair’s numbers and found that the magazine was not in trouble. Its website had 14.3 million unique visitors in October 2016, a 26% increase since October 2015, and more than double its October 2014 traffic. And paid circulation averaged 1.2m for the first six months of 2016, slightly higher than it was five years ago. The Condé Nast lifestyle magazine is bucking the trend of the print magazine sector beset by falling advertising revenues and plummeting sales.

But Trump’s tweet was only the latest salvo in a feud between him and Carter dating back more than a quarter of a century. When the former was an upcoming Manhattan real estate magnate, the latter was a writer for the satirical Spy magazine amused by Trump’s “vainglorious self-image”. “Just to drive him a little bit crazy,” recalled Carter, “I took to referring to him as a ‘short-fingered vulgarian’.” Carter still receives letters from Trump. “There is always a photo of him — generally a tear sheet from a magazine. On all of them he has circled his hand in gold Sharpie in a valiant effort to highlight the length of his fingers. I almost feel sorry for the poor fellow because, to me, the fingers still look abnormally stubby.” Just before Trump decided to stand for the Republican presidential nomination, Carter got the latest. “Like the other packages, this one included a circled hand and the words, also written in gold Sharpie: ‘See, not so short!’ I sent the picture back by return mail with a note attached, saying, ‘Actually, quite short.’ Which I can only assume gave him fits.”

When Carter invested in prominent restaurants in Manhattan, it wasn’t long before Trump delivered his assessment. “Worst food in city,” Trump wrote about the Waverly Inn in 2013. For the past four years, the tweet has been printed at the top of the Waverly Inn menu – presumably for its diners there could be no greater enticement to eat there than the short-fingered vulgarian’s opprobrium.

American Civil Liberties Union

Last week, the ACLU announced it had received more than $7.2m (£5.8m) from 120,000 individual donations. “This is the greatest outpouring of support for the ACLU in our nearly 100-year history, greater than the days after 9/11,” said the union’s executive director, Anthony Romero.

Why now? Because many are worried about what Trump will do to American civil liberties. Writing in the New York Review of Books, the ACLU’s incoming legal director, David Cole, said: “Will he be able to put in place all the worst ideas he tossed out so cavalierly on the campaign trail? Building a wall; banning and deporting Muslims; ending Obamacare; reneging on climate change treaty responsibilities; expanding libel law; criminalising abortion; jailing his political opponents; supporting aggressive stop-and-frisk policing; reviving mass surveillance and torture?” Not on Professor Cole’s watch.

He could well be a busy man. The day after Trump’s election, the ACLU tweeted: “Should President-elect Donald Trump attempt to implement his unconstitutional campaign promises, we’ll see him in court.”

New York Times

Vanity Fair isn’t the only part of the lamestream media to be getting a boost thanks to Trump. Subscriptions to the Gray Lady have soared by 132,000 since Trump’s election – a tenfold rise on the previous year, even though he had claimed that the paper was failing, and railed against it for backing Hillary Clinton. “Far from failing,” retorted Mark Thompson, the Times’s CEO, “we’re seeing remarkable response”.

Just maybe Trump has helped end the post-truth era he arguably created and is inadvertently helping catalyse the revival of quality journalism in an era dominated by the kind of fact-unchecked Twitter rants so virtuosically pioneered by the president-elect. Yeah, right. Let’s not go nuts.

 

[Source:- Gurdian]

 

 

How to move Windows 10 from your old hard drive to SSD

SSD

he move to a solid-state disk will make your Windows PC faster

One of the best ways of making your PC run faster is by installing a solid-state drive (SSD). However, moving Windows to an SSD is not an easy task.

The best way to move Windows 10 (or any other OS) onto an SSD is by using a cloning tool. This takes everything on the old drive and copies onto the new one. Of course, for a lot of people, this will be like trying to fit a pint in a half pint pot. With all your music, photos and videos, taking up a terabyte of space, you may find compromises will have to be made.

Before you move the Windows installation files to an SSD, you have to separate any other data (documents, pictures, music, videos) to another disc as these won’t be transferred to the SSD.

You will then clone the Windows OS onto the new SSD and move personal data onto the old disc. The great thing here is that you will get the benefit of running Windows from a faster drive while retaining the spacious hard drive for data.

If you are doing this with a desktop computer, then you will have little trouble fitting in both the new disc and the old disc as there should be space for both. Things get a little more difficult when it comes to laptops. At this point, you may have to remove the optical drive to fit in a second drive or spend more money on an SSD that can accommodate all the data present on the old disc.

What do you need?

As mentioned before, for this project you will need your current hard drive (or spinning platters of rust), which you will migrate data from; your new solid-state drive which data will be migrated to; and a backup of all your data, as you can only clone the system files.

You will also need a cloning tool. In this instance, we will use EaseUS Todo Backup Free. Mainly because it is free and also because it is easy enough for most people to use. Also, the tool is good at cloning data from a large disc to a much smaller disc

Defrag your disk and back up your data 

As we are cloning a disc, it is a good idea to defrag the file system before we start anything. Click on the Start menu and type in defrag, when you see the option for Disk Defragmenter, click on its and run the tool to tidy up the disc.

Next thing to do is the back up ALL your data. An external drive is a good start or an online service such as CrashPlan is a good alternative, but the latter will take a lot longer to complete, even with a good internet connection.

 

[Source:- ITPRO]

Dual Camera Maker Corephotonics Receives $15 Million Investment From Samsung, Foxconn, Others

Dual Camera Maker Corephotonics Receives $15 Million Investment From Samsung, Foxconn, Others

Israeli firm Corephotonics, specialised in making dual camera setups for smartphones, has managed to raise a whopping $15 million in a funding round. The biggest investors in the company include Foxconn, Samsung, and MediaTek. The investment is significant as it indicates the importance being placed on dual camera setups, seen in such smartphones as the iPhone 7 Plus and the Huawei Mate 9.

According to Israeli publication Globes, the company says it will use the fresh investment along with current cash to develop next generation smartphone cameras, apart from increasing the penetration of existing products. Th funding will supposedly also help the company make its foray into the automotive, drone, surveillance, and action camera markets.

The company, which currently has 50 employees, will reportedly also recruit “dozens of engineers” for its Tel Aviv headquarters, apart from support and integration engineers in China and South Korea. It will also look to acquire complementary companies that work on the same imaging technologies.

This brings the total funds raised by the company to $50 million. Investors in the company also include, Magma VC, Amiti Ventures, Chinese billionaire Li Ka-shing and Solina Chau’s Horizon Ventures, OurCrowd, SanDisk, Chinese telephony services provider CK Telecom, and other private investors.

Corephotonics was founded in 2012 by electro-optics professor at Tel Aviv University David Mendlovic, imaging expert Gal Shabtay and entrepreneur Eran Kali. The company specialises in dual camera technology, inevitably bringing features that are found on professional cameras, to portable smartphones. Alongside the launch of the iPhone 7 Plus last year – an unveiling by a major manufacturer that truly heralded the birth of dual camera setups – Kali said that Corephotonics is “the inventor of the computational dual camera for smartphones,” a concept derived from its own IPs. It will be interesting to see how this technology is taken forward.

 

 

[Source:- gadgets360]

Russia Asks Apple, Google to Remove LinkedIn From App Stores

Russia Asks Apple, Google to Remove LinkedIn From App Stores

Accusing LinkedIn of flouting local laws that require Internet firms to store data on citizens within the nations borders, the Russian authorities have asked Apple and Google to remove the professional networking site app from their online stores.

Recently, a Russian court blocked the Microsoft-owned LinkedIn service for breaching the country’s data protection rules.

According to The New York Times, Apple has confirmed that it was asked to remove its LinkedIn app in Russia about a month ago.

“However, Google has not confirmed if it had removed LinkedIn in Russia but said that it adhered to Russian local laws,” the report added.

Meanwhile, LinkedIn responded that the company was “disappointed” with the decision by Russian regulators to block the service.

“It denies access to our members in Russia and the companies that use LinkedIn to grow their businesses,” Nicole Leverich, a spokeswoman for LinkedIn, was quoted as saying.

LinkedIn has several million users in Russia.

Earlier this week, Apple removed the New York Times from its app store following a request from Chinese authorities claiming the app was in violation of regulations.

China is known for banning digital sites like Facebook and Google that it believes harm its national security or promote misinformation. The Wall Street Journal’s Chinese-language site has been blocked since 2014.

 

 

[Source:- Gadgets360]