Apple Seeds Fourth Beta of New watchOS 4 Operating System to Developers

Image result for Apple Seeds Fourth Beta of New watchOS 4 Operating System to Developers

Apple today seeded the fourth beta of an upcoming watchOS 4 update to developers, a little over one week after seeding the third beta and over a month after introducing the new update at its 2017 Worldwide Developers Conference.

Once the proper configuration profile has been installed from the Apple Developer Center, the watchOS 4 beta can be downloaded through the dedicated Apple Watch app on the iPhone by going to General –> Software update.

To install the update, the Apple Watch needs to have at least 50 percent battery, it must be placed on the charger, and it has to be in range of the iPhone.

watchOS 4 features three new watch faces, including a dedicated Siri watch face that displays dynamic information unique to each individual and is perhaps the most significant new feature in the update. There are also new complications for Now Playing and Apple News, and an enhanced Workout app that supports High Intensity Interval Training and new swimming options.

GymKit, a new technology platform, will let the Apple Watch interface with gym equipment for workout data sharing purposes, and the Activity app will offer up intelligent coaching and tailored workout encouragement along with new monthly activity challenges.

Many other small tweaks and changes have been introduced, all of which are outlined in our dedicated watchOS 4 roundup.

watchOS 4 is only available to developers and will not be provided to public beta testers, so non-developers will need to wait until the software sees an official release in the fall to try it out.

[“Source-macrumors.”]

Apple Seeds Third Beta of New watchOS 4 Operating System to Developers

Image result for Apple Seeds Third Beta of New watchOS 4 Operating System to DevelopersApple today seeded the third beta of an upcoming watchOS 4 update to developers, just over three weeks after seeding the second beta and more than a month after introducing the new update at its 2017 Worldwide Developers Conference. The new version is build 15R5321h.

Once the proper configuration profile has been installed from the Apple Developer Center, the watchOS 4 beta can be downloaded through the dedicated Apple Watch app on the iPhone by going to General –> Software update.
To install the update, the Apple Watch must have 50 percent battery, it must be placed on the charger, and it must be in range of the iPhone.

watchOS 4 features three new watch faces, including a dedicated Siri watch face that displays dynamic information unique to each individual and is perhaps the most significant new feature in the update. There are also new complications for Now Playing and Apple News, and an enhanced Workout app that supports High Intensity Interval Training and new swimming options.

Gymkit, a new technology platform, will let the Apple Watch interface with gym equipment for workout data sharing purposes, and the Activity app will offer up intelligent coaching and tailored workout encouragement along with new monthly activity challenges.

Many other small tweaks and changes have been introduced, all of which are outlined in our dedicated watchOS 4 roundup.

watchOS 4 is only available to developers and will not be provided to public beta testers, so non-developers will need to wait until the software is officially released in the fall to try it out.

[“Source-macrumors”]

IOS 11 BETA: SHOULD YOU DOWNLOAD APPLE’S NEW SOFTWARE FOR IPHONE AND IPAD?

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Most of the new features are on the iPad, and it can be the perfect device for testing out the update / REUTERS/Stephen Lam

Apple has released its iOS 11 beta to the public. That means everyone can get hold of the new software, months before it’s released – but there’s a big catch.

Because the iPhone and iPad operating system isn’t actually finished yet, it’s full of plenty of bugs as well as not being as refined as it will be when it’s officially unveiled. That means that using it comes with a huge warning: it might stop working properly at any time, and you can’t really complain about it if it does.

With that out of the way, it’s worth getting to what iOS 11 does actually give you. The new update – which brings probably the biggest changes ever made to the iPad, and some pretty major ones to the iPhone too – was unveiled at WWDC earlier this month.

It brings proper multitasking to the iPad, allowing people to easily do more than one thing at once and making the tablet into a proper, productivity-focused computer. It updates almost all of Apple’s apps, bringing social features to Apple Music and document scanning to Notes, for instance.

And it changes the way the camera works in a major way, adding new ways of taking and editing photos. That comes alongside support for ARKit – Apple’s new technology built to make it easier for people to create apps that use augmented reality.

How to install iOS 11 before everyone else

But the big question is whether you should start using it now, or wait until it’s officially released, probably in September.

The main thing you need to ask yourself is how much you rely on your device. If you need to make sure that it is always ready to respond for work, for instance, then don’t update to the beta: though bugs are rare within the software, they do have an annoying tendency to pop up exactly when you need to write an important email.

You might also found that apps haven’t been updated to work with the new software, and so might not work at all. You won’t know that until you upgrade – so if there is anything you rely on a lot, it’s also worth skipping this update.

Equally, if you don’t rely really on your device – if you have an iPad that you use only some of the time for reading or watching TV, for instance – then you should think about giving it a try.

In fact, the iPad is the perfect place to try the new update out on. Most of the biggest updates that iOS 11 brings are on the tablet – meaning that as well as being a less risky device to try it out on, you also get to experience the full joy of the new features.

Prime among those is multitasking, which also brings with it a redesigned home screen and way of using features like drag and drop. Those are explained to you when you first fire up iOS 11 on your iPad.

The problem is also that those new multitasking features also use up a lot of processing power – important, when the tablet is also trying to handle an operating system that doesn’t make use of the processing power in the most efficient way.

So if you do depend on your iPad for work, for instance, it’s probably best holding off for now. But if you can put up with it stuttering and becoming confused sometimes, then you’ll get the most out of putting it on there.

On the other hand, the upgrades to the iPhone are relatively few, though there’s still plenty of significant new features. While the updates to Siri, Apple Music, Messages, Maps and more are all fun, they’re relatively minor for the time being – while that means you’re less likely to run into problems, it also means that you’ll get a lot less out of taking the risk and diving into the new software straight away.

The same thing applies to macOS, which is also part of the beta programme. Apple has mostly focused on tightening up and straightening out parts of that software – which is great, but will be outweighed by the bugs of beta software and so it’s probably best to wait to update your MacBook or iMac for now.

In all cases, it’s worth remembering that you don’t need to sign up now, since the beta programme will be in effect all the time until the new software is officially released. With every new update to the preview, some of those bugs and problems are removed – so you can wait until later on and hold our for a more dependable version of iOS 11.

If you decide that you do want to get hold of the beta, head to beta.apple.com on the device that you want to sign up to it with. (You can do so on any Apple device that supports the update, which includes most iPads and iPhones, as well as the Apple TV.

[“Source-independent”]

Adobe’s Stock Contributor enters beta

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Adobe is going all out with their stock photo service. After integrating it with their CC applications, announcing plans to revolutionize the stock industry, and printing stock photos on t-shirts, we are getting a way to contribute our own photos…and vectors…and videos.

Adobe wants it all; with the new Adobe Stock contributor site, you can give it to them.

It’s a relatively simple platform for uploading files and selling them. It will also keep you informed of your files’ status during the approval process, and, of course, track your sales.

In addition to dragging and dropping files into the browser, you can also upload via FTP, which is useful for anyone with a lot of large files to upload. It should be noted that video uploads are only uploaded via FTP.

The service is currently in beta, but it’s already got some great features.

Let’s start with the obvious: Adobe CC integration. There’s already a new plugin for Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Bridge that will allow you to upload stock photos to theStock Contributor site right from those apps. So don’t bother opening a browser window. Once you’re happy with a photo, just set it to upload, and move right on to the next one.

If we want to see an end to the kinds of stock photos that get ironically printed onto t-shirts, Adobe users will have to contribute something better

Secondly, Adobe is using machine learning to automatically assign keywords to uploaded photos based on similar images. Just upload, check the keywords, get rid of any that don’t apply, and add any you feel are missing. For people who upload a lot of photos at once, this should save a lot of time. Of course, this is machine learning. It won’t be perfect. However, it will get better as more people use it, and more images are uploaded. It’ll be fun to see how good computers get at identifying objects in photos.

Adobe has made much of their plans to revolutionize stock as a concept. The truth of the matter is that they’ll be selling the media that we upload. If we want to see an end to the kinds of stock photos that get ironically printed onto t-shirts, Adobe users will have to contribute something better.

Like other companies before it, Adobe’s just giving us an easy way to do that, and perhaps even profit from it. Almost makes me want to dust off my camera and hunt down my cats.

 

 


[Source:- webdesignerdepot]

 

Dreamweaver Beta 3 is out now

featured_dreamweaver

At long last, Adobe has discovered the text editor. Yes, I’m kidding, but let’s not lie to ourselves; the main feature of the DW series has always been the drag ‘n’ drop editor. Sure, you could use it as a code-only editor, but there were always much cheaper alternatives that did it better.

They also did it faster.

Well the new Dreamweaver Beta 3 is out, and Adobe is trying to shake off the specter of versions past. I gave it a whirl, and found plenty to like, and a few things to be sarcastic about— it’s a win-win for me.

First, let’s tackle the latest features, most of which have to do with the “code workspace” (that is, the text editor). Firstly, Dreamweaver now supports PHP 5.6 all the way. That’s great for everybody who hasn’t moved to the latest stable version of PHP, which is 7.0.1—Ah, they’ll get there.

The full screen mode for the text editor now works on Mac. “That’s good, probably,” said the Windows/Linux guy.

You can now compile LESS and SASS on demand, or automatically. Take your pick. Files inside of your “Site” or project folder get compiled automatically. Files outside of the project folder can be compiled by hitting F9.

Lastly, they made some small tweaks and improvements to the find/replace function.

Now I’d like to mention some things that I liked about it when I tried it out:

  • They’re making it even easier to work with media queries in Live Mode. You can add them straight from the rulers on the top and sides now.
  • Emmet seems to be a default feature. Always a win for us front-end guys.
  • They have pre-installed snippets for Bootstrap components, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, and other popular frameworks. We can probably expect to see this list grow over time.
  • It really does run a lot faster than I remember it running in the old days. It seems Adobe is pushing for better performance in all of their products, and Dreamweaver got the treatment too.

Dreamweaver is still a huge application, and doesn’t have that beautiful sense of focus that you get from text editors like Atom, Sublime Text, or even Visual Studio Code. It is making a lot of progress in the right direction, though. I can easily see it being used in multidisciplinary teams and agencies, where some might design primarily in live mode, and others focus on the back end.

With the current pricing scheme, it probably won’t be competing with design teams that want a purely visual tool. They’ll still be flocking to the cloud applications.

To justify that monthly price per person, it’s for people who need both.

 

 

[Source:- webdesignerdepot]

Siri takes control as Apple’s macOS Sierra beta arrives

macos sierra installer icon

Less than a month after its unveiling at Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference in June, macOS Sierra arrived today for beta testers who have signed up to try Apple’s new desktop operating system. This is the third year in a row Apple has offered a public beta of an upcoming desktop OS.

This year the Mac platform gets some significant enhancements, with Sierra bringing one notable feature that promises to change how users interact with their Mac. After teasing users in 2015 with a revamped Spotlight in OS X El Capitan that understood sophisticated requests, Sierra finally brings Siri to the Mac.

Siri’s integration means you’ll be able to control certain functions on your Mac using natural language voice commands, and Siri on the desktop is just as functional as Siri on the iPhone, and with Mac-specific tricks, too. From what I’ve seen using the early Sierra betas, I expect to be spending more time talking to my Mac.

Siri on macOS Michael deAgonia
Siri is accessed from an icon in the Dock, by invoking a key command or from the menubar.

Sierra gets more than just Siri

Sierra isn’t due out in final form until sometime this fall. But beta users, as of today, can check out the tweaks and additions the upgrade offers to make using your Mac a better experience. Those features include picture-in-picture for videos, better photo organization, improved device collaboration via the Universal Clipboard, iCloud Drive (which allows shared Desktop and Documents across all of your Apple devices), and Auto Unlocking your Mac when you wear your Apple Watch (running watchOS 3).

sierra watch unlock
macOS Sierra will allow Apple Watch users to unlock their Mac automatically. (The option is tucked away in the Security preferences.)


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But the biggest standout feature is Siri, which arrives on the desktop years after its debut as an app in iOS and then as a tent-pole feature for the iPhone platform. Apple now joins the ranks of other big-league developers, including Microsoft, Google and even Amazon, who are rapidly rolling out voice-activated features for their products. (FYI: Siri stacks up well against Cortana.)

Before I get into more details about Sierra, a programming note: If you haven’t signed up for Apple’s beta program but would like to, you can do so here. Just a warning: this is a beta, so there will likely be issues if you’re running this operating system. Apple still has months of work ahead to bring Sierra to its final, shipping form. Remember: before you rush to install it, always have a backup of your computer, and never use a beta on production-critical hardware.

A Siri-ously big deal

It’s been five years since Siri’s introduction on the iPhone. Since then, public acceptance of using voicing commands to control a device has slowly been on the rise. Amazon, Google and Microsoft all have virtual assistants now, and, for Apple’s part, the Siri technology has been expanding the use of voice commands in a variety of devices. Siri has bounced from the iPhone to the iPad to Apple TV and CarPlay. If history is any indicator — and by history, I mean Apple’s other product releases — Siri integration will absolutely change how you interact with the Mac — even if you’re still not sold on voice interaction.

Why? Because over the years, Siri has learned platform-specific tricks that make interacting with devices much more effective. For instance, when Siri is prompted on the Apple TV for a specific show, Siri searches across all supported apps and displays the relevant results, saving you the trouble of opening and poking around for that specific show. And on Apple TV, rewinding and fast-forwarding to specific spots isn’t much of an issue when you can tell Siri to just skip back or ahead with your voice.

Siri will be no different. It’s still as whimsical as it is on the iPhone (ask how it feels about living in a Mac and Siri might joke about living in an aluminum housing with no Windows). But there are a variety of new tricks that should be helpful for day to day users.

siri prefs
Siri’s new Preference pane under System Preferences allows you to customize it and change voices.

 

On the Mac, Siri is accessed from an icon in the Dock, by invoking a key command (Command-Space, by default) or from the menubar, next to the Notification and Spotlight icons. (The “Hey, Siri” voice invocation used in iOS – where Siri is always listening and can respond — isn’t yet an option on the desktop.)

siri weather Michael deAgonia
Siri can quickly deliver the latest weather forecast.

Once active, you can use Siri to create appointments and reminders, send messages, ask for current or future weather forecasts, play a specific song (or an entire album or playlist), check sports scores, or even ask for directions. All of these requests work just as expected. However, I did have trouble getting Siri to bring up photos in my Photo Library, but I’m chalking this up as a bug. (Remember, as I’ve already noted: using a beta, even a public one, means you will likely encounter issues.)

Siri still provides online and local searches, and when performing local searches, it recognizes Finder tags, dates and other attributes. That allows you to perform specific inquiries you’d normally turn to Spotlight for. Since Siri does a decent job following a particular train of thought, you can refine searches with follow-up questions or requests. Just don’t be surprised if you get the occasional Siri sass. (During the WWDC keynote, Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering, asked Siri to bring up some files he was looking for and she noted that his “data filin’ was stylin’.”)

Even better, Siri can save your queries and the results in the Notification area for quick access later. That means everything from local file searches to sports scores can be pinned there for easy access later. And from these search widgets, you can keep track of specific files for that project you’re working on, drag and drop the results into live documents, or simply store sports scores for current games you’re interested in.

siri search Michael deAgonia
Siri is aware of tags and can be used to find files using keywords

Other changes in Sierra and final thoughts

Of course Siri isn’t the only new feature in Sierra. Other useful additions include:

  • The ability to play any video in a small window that hovers above your work
  • Optimized storage, which can be used to free up space by clearing your hard drive of older files (and storing them in Apple’s iCloud servers for later retrieval, or, in the case of obsolete system files, removing them entirely).
  • Advanced Continuity features that allow Apple devices to communicate and work more effectively with each other, including the new Universal Clipboard. This lets you copy data or a picture on your iPhone and paste it into a document on your Mac without using Messages, Notes or AirDrop. The ability to easily move data between Apple devices is coming, and it already works pretty well in the public beta. (Note: For this to work, every device needs to be running the latest beta software.) This feature alone might be worth the upgrade in the fall for many.

When Siri was first released, I mused that any technology hoping to gain mass appeal had to be good enough to change someone’s thought process from “Why are you using that?” to “Why aren’t you using that?” Siri’s capabilities and accuracy have grown over the years, and its features continue to evolve as the tech spreads from one Apple product to another. At the time, I wondered where the technology would go.

Now we know the answer: on our Macs. And now you can try it for yourself, months before other Mac users get their shot.

 

 

[Source:CW]